As you begin the process of managing assessment in your department or division, you will need to be cognizant of how assessment projects will be coordinated.

Some benefits to setting a coordination structure include:

  • The ability to provide support and resources that will allow for learning opportunities to build assessment capacity with your staff
  • A coordinated location for assessment efforts to ensure quality control and avoid duplication of efforts
  • The ability to keep survey fatigue at bay
  • Better understanding from top to bottom of how assessment is being used.

You will also want to avoid having a coordination structure that is too challenging to navigate while having enough of a framework in place to help users easily understand how the Baseline system works for your campus. Some challenges that can occur from a too challenging or too restrictive structure:

  • “Rogue” assessment, or the process of users circumventing the structure that that you have coordinated by conducting assessment through other means or methods
  • Low activity resulting from the impression that it is the job of the contact person for Baseline or the assessment committee to conduct assessment for the campus.
  • Avoidance of assessment in general because there are too many layers or “hoops to jump through” in order to coordinate an assessment effort.

The following are suggestions for using Campus Labs to streamline and coordinate assessment well in your department or division. 

 Example 1: Limited number of users

Access is limited to just an institutional research and/or assessment office on campus.  In this model very few people have access so there is little need for a coordination strategy. It is assumed assessment and data collection efforts are being coordinated internally within the office.  Note: This can be combined with Example 4 or 5 below to ensure that projects outside the office can be completed in the system.

 Example 2: Expanded use to assessment office plus assessment committee

Because access is still limited to a small number of people, coordination can be done between the office and the committee in order to ensure data is being collected appropriately. Note: This can be combined with Example 4 or 5 below to ensure that projects outside the office can be completed in the system.

The remaining examples expand beyond just a small number of people to include more general users on campus. 

 Example 3: All users operate individually (loosely controlled)

Any faculty/staff  that would like to use the system is allowed access without coordinating or touching base with anyone on the campus.

  • In this case there is no on-campus “middle man”, once someone has a login they can use th system as they see fit
  • Can be a quicker process due to fewer people involved
  • Campus administrator will need to consistently monitor the project list to prevent over-surveying, repetitive data collection, and lack of thorough planning/intention behind the assessment.

 Example 4: All activity is managed by the campus administrator or committee (tightly controlled)

There is one person/committee who coordinators all assessment efforts including:

  • Working directly with individuals who would like to use Baseline in order to request projects, approve survey previews, and answer questions.
  • Easy to keep track of all assessment projects taking place
  • Administrator/committee has client administrator privileges and can therefore view all projects for all departments in our system
  • Due to “middle man” process may take longer, but also requires individuals to plan  for their assessments in order to go through the process

Example 5: Combination of 1 and 2

There is one administrator/committee who coordinates the process at the beginning, however, once an individual user has done a project, they are “on their own” and can submit projects as they please.

  • Administrator/committee can provide an “orientation” to Baseline and let individual users know of any campus-specific processes or procedures they need to be aware of. That way if they would like to use an assessment planning document or survey approval process they can still coordinate that from their end.
  • Administrator/committee has client administrator privileges and can therefore view all projects for all departments in our system
  • Less time-consuming for the administrator/committee than in Example 2, but still serves as a contact person on the campus
  • Each individual has direct communication with Campus Labs once they have received their login and “orientation” information from the administrator/committee.

Example 6: Departmental Representation

There is one individual in each department/college/unit that serves as the assessment coordinator for their area.

  • All logins for departmental staff are requested by this individual directly to Campus Labs
  • All assessment projects are “approved” by this individual
  • Either this person or each individual user can request the project with Campus Labs once it has been approved by the departmental coordinator.
  • The departmental assessment coordinator is responsible for informing the campus administrator/committee of assessment activity in their department on a regular basis; this allows the campus administrator/committee to create a list or calendar of all assessment activity.
  • Administrator/committee has client administrator privileges and can therefore view all projects for all departments in our system
  • Allows for oversight of activity, but because it is department based, this process is not as time consuming for the campus administrator/committee.

Once a coordination method is selected, your Consultant will help you set up the right user access privileges. (See explanation of User Access Levels.)

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